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Meet Jones Bassey, the Young Akwa Ibomite who designed and built a drone

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Jones Bassey, a young graduate of the Department of Electrical/Electronics Engineering, University of Uyo and his team successfully flew a locally made drone last year November.

According to Jones, work on the drone which was a final year project in view of their qualification as graduates of the institution began in January, 2017.

“On January 2017 I coordinated a group of five smart Engineers Ekemini Abner, Ekpo Esua Ekpo, Gabriel Umoh, & Faith okon all Electrical Electronics Engineers as we dared the undared by designing, fabricating & producing an unmanned aerial vehicle popularly known as DRONE,” Jones wrote in a Facebook post.

He said the entire process of designing,fabricating and producing the unmanned aerial vehicle was very daunting.

“It was a daunting task, we failed many times, discouraged because of high cost of components importation, frustrated because most items were not found in Nigerian market,”

The recent graduate revealed their perseverance got the work done.

Mr Bassey who took to Facebook yesterday to reveal the challanges and ensuing success he and his team encountered said:

“I’ve not been moved to post this achievement on social media, but for some strange combination of reasons I’m posting it today to encourage someone embarking on any project. Nothing is too difficult to achieve, though we come from Nigeria, there’s a lot we can do technologically.”

 

 

 

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Facebook May Introduce A Downvote Button  

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Social media platform Facebook is testing a new “downvote” button that will let people hide comments and provide feedback about them.

The social network has openly said that the new feature isn’t a “dislike” button, which many Facebook users have requested over the years. The downvote button is currently being tried out by a number of users in the US only. The company also announced a number of other measures aimed at improving the Facebook community.

The social network confirmed the test to news site Tech Crunch. “We are exploring a feature for people to give us feedback about comments on public page posts. This is running for a small set of people in the US only,” the company said in a statement. Other social sites such as Reddit have a “downvote” option that reduces the visibility of unpopular posts.

When Facebook’s downvote button is clicked, the selected comment is hidden. People can then decide whether to flag a post as “offensive”, “misleading” or “off-topic”. However, it does not affect the visibility of the post for other people and does not affect its ranking in the news feed. Responsibility

Martin Garner, tech analyst at CCS Insight, said the button appeared to be part of Facebook’s efforts to avoid being presenting itself as a publisher. “It has become very clear that Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t want Facebook to have the responsibility of identifying what is offensive or misleading -and what is not – because that would put him into the position of being a publisher rather than a platform,” he said.

“He doesn’t want to do that as it takes the business in a different direction – so he is leaning on the community to do it. “It is an open question as to whether that’s the right answer or not but that’s where this fits in.” On Friday, the company also announced it would double the number of engineers it employs in London to develop solutions to the problems Facebook faces.

It declined to share how many additional engineers it was hiring, but said the move was an investment to “remove bad content from the platform”. “Whether it’s scamming, bullying, harassment or false news, they will work with experts to understand the issue, identify the pattern and build a solution,” said Facebook’s Chris Cox.

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Nigerian Telecom Operators Are Likely to implement Data Roll-over Period

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The Association of Licensed Telecommunications Operators of Nigeria (ALTON) says its members are likely to implement the 14 days grace for data roll over planned by the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC).

Mr Gbenga Adebayo, the Chairman of ALTON, disclosed this in an interview in Lagos. NCC is working to issue a directive to telecommunications operators to give 14 days’ window to subscribers to enable them to roll over their unused data. Adebayo said that the period for data roll over was a commercial issue, which each telecommunications operator would determine how it suited its business plan.

“The decision is left to the individual players. As an industry player; I think it is good for th subscribers.

“If the data roll over grace makes the subscribers happy, I am certain that our members will align with the directive provided it does not impact on the existing cost,” he said. On its part, the National Association of Telecommunications Subscribers (NATCOMS) has called on NCC to extend the grace period to 30 days.

The President of NATCOMS, Chief Deolu Ogunbanjo, told NAN that 14 days was not enough, considering the present economic situation. Ogunbanjo said that the idea would ensure that telecommunications subscribers got value for money with regard to data usage. According to him, the grace period for the voice recharge is 90 days hence data subscription should not be different.

NAN also reports that the Executive Vice-Chairman, NCC, Prof. Umar Danbatta, said that subscribers would be given the 14 days grace even if they do not renew on the date of expiration of their data. Danbatta said that this would stop the present practice where subscribers would lose the entire unused data, if they failed to renew on the date of the expiration of the present subscription.

According to him, NCC recognises that telecommunications services are very important to the nation’s development. “NCC also recognises more importantly that the consumers of telecommunications services deserve to get value for their money. “NCC also recognises that consumer should be treated as a very important stakeholder in the scheme of things as far as service delivery is concerned.

“Let me recall that in the Eight-Point Agenda of my administration, the issue of empowerment and protection of the consumer occupied the sixth position.

“The vision in this agenda is to protect consumers from unfair practices through availability of information and education to make informed choices in the use of ICT services,” he said.

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Meet Jones Bassey, the Young Akwa Ibomite who designed and built a drone

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Jones Bassey, a young graduate of the Department of Electrical/Electronics Engineering, University of Uyo and his team successfully flew a locally made drone last year November.

Jones Bassey

According to Jones, work on the drone which was a final year project in view of their qualification as graduates of the institution began in January, 2017.

“On January 2017 I coordinated a group of five smart Engineers Ekemini Abner, Ekpo Esua Ekpo, Gabriel Umoh, & Faith okon all Electrical Electronics Engineers as we dared the undared by designing, fabricating & producing an unmanned aerial vehicle popularly known as DRONE,” Jones wrote in a Facebook post.

Drone in Production Phase AkwaIbomINFO

Drone in Production Phase

He said the entire process of designing,fabricating and producing the unmanned aerial vehicle was very daunting.

Drone undergoing Test

“It was a daunting task, we failed many times, discouraged because of high cost of components importation, frustrated because most items were not found in Nigerian market,”

The recent graduate revealed their perseverance got the work done.

Mr Bassey who took to Facebook this morning to reveal the challenges and ensuing success he and his team encountered.

Drone in flight

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in flight

He said, “I’ve not been moved to post this achievement on social media, but for some strange combination of reasons I’m posting it today to encourage someone embarking on any project. Nothing is too difficult to achieve, though we come from Nigeria, there’s a lot we can do technologically.”

______
Follow us on twitter via @akwaibominfo

Share your story with us via SMS and WhatsApp on 0902 211 0018


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SpaceX Successfully Sends World’s Most Powerful Rocket into Space 

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SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy, the world’s most powerful rocket, thundered to life and shot away from FloridaTuesday on the power of 27 engines and nearly 5 million pounds of thrust, kicking off a spectacular maiden flight to send founder Elon Musk’s cherry red Tesla Roadster on a “just for fun” journey beyond the orbit of Mars.

It was easily the loudest and possibly most dramatic launch from Florida’s “Space Coast” since NASA’s space shuttle was retired in 2011 with the Falcon Heavy, made up of three strapped-together core stages powered by nine engines each, putting on a dazzling show for tourists and area residents jamming

nearby roads and beaches. Spectacular as it was, the launching was just the appetizer for a long- awaited test flight.

 

Eight minutes after the rocket took off, two of the three Falcon 9 core stages that helped power the vehicle out of the lower atmosphere made rocket-powered descents to side-by-side touchdowns at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, generating thunderous sonic booms as they slowed for landing.

Recovering rocket stages was impressive in its own right, but it was a secondary test objective.

The primary goal was to prove the rocket’s ability to boost heavy payloads into space. Elon Musk “giddy” ahead of SpaceX’s historic Falcon Heavy launch While the Tesla on board for the rocket’s first test flight tipped the scales at a relatively modest one ton or thereabouts, the Heavy has the ability to boost nearly 140,000 pounds to low-Earth orbit and more than 37,000 pounds to Earth-escape trajectories to Mars.

NASA is currently building an even more powerful rocket known as the Space Launch System, or SLS, that will generate 8.8 million pounds of thrust in its initial configuration and up to 11.9 million pounds in a follow-on cargo variant. The initial version will be able to boost more than 50,000 pounds to Earth-escape velocity.

But the SLS is not expected to fly until late 2019 or later. Until then, the Falcon Heavy will be the world’s most powerful rocket, offering a relatively low-cost option for getting heavy payloads into space for NASA, the Department of Defense and commercial satellite operators.

The business end of the Falcon Heavy: 27 Merlin engines, clustered in groups of nine, developing nearly 5 million pounds of thrust at liftoff SpaceX U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who attended the launch at the Kennedy Space Center, said the Heavy offers a promising alternative for heavy weight national security satellites that are too big for the Falcon 9 and currently fly exclusively on more expensive United Launch Alliance Delta 4s.

“The national security people have indicated that assuming this test or a subsequent one goes well they would plan to use this Falcon Heavy for classified missions,” he said. The rocket also could be used to launch astronauts or space tourists to the moon, although plans for such flights are not yet mature.

Made up of three strapped-together Falcon 9 first stages and a single upper stage, carrying the Tesla, the Falcon Heavy’s engines flashed to life at 3:45 p.m. EST (GMT-5), two hours and 15 minutes late because of higher-than-allowable upper-level winds.

After a lightning-fast round of computer checks, the 229-foot-tall rocket was released to climb away from from the pad, shattering the afternoon calm with an ear-splitting roar and an impossible-to-miss rush of fire from all 27 engines, nine at the base of each core stage. Going into the flight, Musk predicted a 50 percent to 70 percent chance of success based in large part on the difficulty predicting how the vehicle would respond to extreme aerodynamic stresses and vibrations from the clustered engines. SpaceX Falcon Heavy launches Tesla into orbit.

As it accelerated skyward, aerodynamic forces quickly ramped up, forming an invisible “bow shock” over the nose of the central core stage, creating complex interactions and, possibly, localized heating as the spacecraft picked up speed plowing through the thick lower atmosphere. But the Heavy endured those stresses, rocketing through the speed of sound and the region of maximum aerodynamic stress about a minute after liftoff.

The 18 engines in the two outboard core stages shut down two-and-a-half minutes after launch. Both stages then separated from the core booster, flipped around, restarted three engines each and began flying back to Florida. The nine center stage engines continued firing for another 30 seconds or so before they, too, shut down and the second stage pulled away on its own, lighting up a single Merlin engine to continue the boost toward a preliminary orbit.

The central core stage then fired three of its engines to set up a landing on an off-shore drone ship stationed several hundred miles east of Cape Canaveral. The two outboard stages, meanwhile, restarted three engines to slow down for atmospheric entry. The burns — brilliant side-by-side jets of flame — were clearly visible across Florida’s east coast as the boosters plunged tail-first toward pads at Landing Zone 1 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Falling like bombs, the rockets each restarted a single engine to slow for touchdown, each one deploying four landing legs.

Falcon Heavy side cores touching down at SpaceX’s Landing Zones 1 and 2, about 8 minutes after launch on Feb. 6, 2018. SpaceX Heralded by dual sonic booms that thundered across Cape Canaveral, both boosters touched down about eight minutes after liftoff. A few moments after that, the second stage engine shut down putting the rocket and Musk’s still-attached Tesla Roadster into a preliminary orbit. A second engine firing 20 minutes later was planned to adjust the orbit as required to set up a trajectory to Mars.

A third rocket firing was planned about six hours later to boost the spacecraft’s velocity to nearly 25,000 mph, fast enough to escape the pull of Earth’s gravity. Again, Musk downplayed expectations. “Once we reach orbit, we’ve got a very long coast, we’ve got a six-hour coast before restart, which is twice as long as we’ve ever coasted a stage,” he said. “So we could see the fuel potentially freeze, because it’s out there in deep space and when it’s not facing the sun it’s at three degrees above absolute zero.

“So it could easily freeze, or the liquid oxygen could boil off, so there’s a lot that could go wrong.”

Assuming it makes it through the high-radiation environment of Earth’s Van Allen belts, and assuming the Falcon Heavy’s second stage propellant doesn’t freeze or boil away, the flight plan called for the Tesla to be released on a trajectory carrying it slightly farther than the orbit of Mars.

The Tesla Roadster mounted atop the Falcon Heavy’s upper stage included a mannequin known as Starman strapped in the driver’s seat, its left arm causually draped over the door. The Tesla took the place of what SpaceX founder Elon Musk called a more “boring” mass simulator for the Heavy’s first flight.

“It’s just for fun,” Musk laughed in an interview. “A lot of people (wondered) what’s the purpose of sending a car to Mars? There’s no point, obviously! It’s just for fun and to get the public excited.” SpaceX posted live streaming video on YouTube showing Starman hurtling ever deeper into space.

 

Cc:CBSNews

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